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NEWS
Набиране на съдии за Единния патентен съд

Единният патентен съд, създаден въз основа на Споразумението за единен патентен съд, като наднационален съд, специализиран в патентни спорове, ще има широка и изключителна компетентност по отношение на нарушението и валидността на европейските патенти и европейските патенти с единно действие.

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Проект на ЕПВ за подготовка на европейски патентни представители от България
Европейското патентно ведомство /ЕПВ/ и Патентното ведомство на Република България в изпълнение на проекта в рамките на пътната карта за сътрудничество със страните-членки на Европейската патентна организация /ЕПО/ за 2015-2018г. и в подкрепа на кандидатите за Европейския квалификационен изпит - EQE за европейски патентни представители (Candidate Support ProjectCSP) и професията „европейски патентен представител” ОРГАНИЗИРАТ селекция на национално ниво на кандидати за подготвителни курсове за полагане на изпит за европейски патентен представител. В проекта участва и Институтът на професионалните представители пред Европейското патентно ведомство (epi).
Read more...
 
Updates Print
OHIM Press Release Alicante, February 1, 2016
DESIGN EUROPA AWARDS: CELEBRATING DESIGN IN THE EUROPA
Applications are now open for the inaugural edition of the DesignEuropa Awards, organised by the Officefor Harmonization in the Internal Market (OHIM), the EU’s largest intellectual property agency.
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Deadline approaching: Internships for patent professionals in Munich
The closing date for application is 31 January 2016.

Praktika Intern 2016 – working with examiners
11 - 28 October 2016
European Patent Office,Munich
The closing date for applications is 31 January 2016.
The Praktika Intern programme is designed for professional representatives with experience in drafting and prosecuting European patent applications. Interns spend three weeks in Directorate-General 1, which is responsible for search, examination and opposition. They have the opportunity to work on actual case files and run prior-art searches. This way, interns will get the chance to look at their daily work from the viewpoint of EPO examiners and gain valuable insights into how the EPO works.
For more information, please see the Official Journal November 2015: OJ EPO 2015, A98
Apply now

A new report from the Office for Harmonization in the Internal Market (OHIM):
 
€1.4 billion lost every year across the EU due to fake toys and games   &
Graphics

Press release: From Kyoto to Paris - Inventions in climate change mitigation technologies growing strongly 

.         New report finds number of inventions in sustainable technologies worldwide increased almost fivefold between 1995 and 2011
·         First comprehensive analysis of patent and economic data on CCMTs in Europe
·         Europe produces 18% of the world’s CCMT inventions, and 40% of the “high-value” inventions where patent protection is sought in more than     one  country 
 ·        Public policies appear to have triggered development of CCMT inventions which are helping to decarbonise the economy
 .        EPO President Battistelli: “The patent system has an important role to play in encouraging research, development and innovation, as well as supporting trade and investment flows, and the transfer of new climate change mitigation technologies across regions.”  
Paris/Munich, 8 December 2015 –  A new study conducted by the European Patent Office (EPO) and the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) shows that inventions in climate change mitigation technologies have seen a fivefold increase worldwide between 1995 and 2011. It also finds that Europe is a leading region for low-carbon inventions.“New technologies are urgently needed to tackle the global challenge of climate change,” said EPO President Benoît Battistelli. “The report shows that in combination with clear legislation and policies to promote climate-change mitigation technologies, the patent system can support research, development and innovation in this field, as well as boosting trade and investment flows, and the transfer of these new technologies to other regions.”
Green technologies on the rise
Presented at the Sustainable Innovation Forum 2015 organised alongside the UNFCC COP 21 in Paris, the report finds that the number of inventions in climate change mitigation technologies (CCMTs) worldwide has risen steadily since the signing of the Kyoto Protocol in 1997 (see Graph 1: A boom in green tech inventions). This suggests that the implementation of climate change policies has helped stimulate innovation in CCMTs. The growth in low-carbon inventions has been much faster than in other technologies; today they represent nearly 6% of all of the world’s inventions, up from 2% in 1995. Public policies put in place after the Kyoto Protocol signing appear to have been particularly successful in encouraging the development of CCMTs in Europe. As a result, the carbon intensity of Europe’s GDP has fallen by 30% in the past decades (Graph 2: CCMT inventions and CO2 intensity in Europe), and has been the lowest in the developed world since 2000.
A marketplace for CCMTs
The study shows that Europe is among the leaders in technical advances towards a low-carbon economy. The region produces nearly one fifth of all low-carbon inventions in the world. Looking at “high-value” inventions (those with higher economic potential, for which patent protection is sought in more than one country), Europeans account for nearly two-fifths.Europe’s contribution to global inventive efforts is very significant across all CCMT areas (Graph 3: European CCMT inventions by technology).
Most CCMT inventions in Europe (and also worldwide) are made in the clean energy and transport sectors, followed by buildings. When comparing CCMT inventions with inventions in all areas of technology, Europe has become increasingly specialised since 1995, and is now among the most advanced regions in the world in low-carbon technologies.Six countries account for more 80% of all European inventions in sustainable technologies; Germany leads, with almost half of Europe’s CCMT inventions, followed by France, the UK, Italy, Sweden and Spain (Graph 4: European CCMT inventions by country). Allowing for economic size, Germany is still ahead, followed by Sweden, France, Finland, Austria and Denmark (Graph 5: European CCMT inventions per GDP by country). Meanwhile other countries, including Greece and Portugal, also show high degrees of technological specialisation in CCMTs (Graph 6: Degree of technological specialisation in CCMTs of European countries).
Europe is also strong in trade of low-carbon goods; it is the biggest importer and second-largest exporter of CCMT products during the analysed period. At the same time, the region acts as a major source of Foreign Direct Investment in CCMTs, with investment spanning all continents. The study shows that cross-border patent filings go hand in hand with trade and foreign investment in CCMTs, which encourages international technology transfer of CCMTs through these channels.
A comprehensive source of information on green tech
Patent trends and statistics can give powerful and important early indications of technological and economic developments. In response to demand from organisations active in climate-change issues, the EPO has developed a dedicated tagging scheme for patent documents relating to climate change mitigation technologies. This greatly increases transparency and enables users – whether companies, engineers, scientists, institutions or policy-makers – to better access and use the wealth of information available in the EPO's free patent databases. The new scheme, also in combination with patent statistics tools (such as the EPO’s PATSTAT), makes it possible to map sustainable technologies, identify trends and derive facts and evidence on which to base policy and business decisions. The EPO has just completed this patent classification scheme, which now covers all CCMTs, including energy, carbon capture, and low-carbon inventions in buildings, transport, production, waste and smart grids. To date, the databases contain some 2.8 million documents related to sustainable technologies – the biggest single repository of low carbon technologies in the world.
EPO-UNEP: shedding light on the debate
In order to facilitate an informed debate about the role of patents in the development and deployment of sustainable technologies, the EPO and UNEP have worked together closely since 2009 on a series of joint studies looking at patent filing trends in CCMTs. The latest report "Climate change mitigation technologies in Europe – evidence from patent and economic data” follows three previous reports: "Patents and climate change mitigation technologies in Latin America and the Caribbean" (2014), "Patents and clean energy technologies in Africa" (2013) and "Patents and clean energy technologies" (2010). 

Download ·        
Full report:  Climate change mitigation technologies in Europe – evidence from patent and economic data (December 2015)
· Executive summary of the report (EN/FR/DE)
· Infographic (EN): Green technologies: how inventive is Europe?
· Brochure (short summary of Europe report): Five facts about climate change, innovation and the role of patents (EN)
· Brochure (summary of all EPO-UNEP reports): Patents and climate change mitigation technologies: evidence to support policy (EN)         

About the EPO

With some 7 000 employees, the European Patent Office (EPO) is one of the largest European public service institutions. Its headquarters are in Munich and it also has offices in Berlin, Brussels, The Hague and Vienna. The EPO was founded with the aim of strengthening co-operation on patents in Europe. Through its centralised patent granting procedure, inventors can obtain patent protection in up to 38 member states of the European Patent Organisation. The EPO is also the world's leading public authority for patent searches and information.

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DesignEuropa Awards: celebrating design in the EU

To celebrate the importance of design in the EU, the Office for Harmonization in the Internal Market (OHIM), the EU’s largest intellectual property agency, is today announcing the first edition of the Design Europa Awards.

€500 million lost every year throughout the EU due to fake sports equipment
The sale of fake sports equipment, like footballs, sports helmets, tennis rackets, skis, gym equipment and skateboards, costs legitimate EU manufacturers €500 million every year.
A new study from the Office for Harmonization in the Internal Market (OHIM), the EU’s largest intellectual property agency, shows that the sales lost due to counterfeiting of sports equipment – not including sportswear – correspond to 6.5% of all sales in this sector across the EU-28.
The study also shows that approximately 2,800 jobs are lost in this sector throughout the EU, as manufacturers sell less than they would have done in the absence of counterfeiting, and therefore employ fewer people.
Every year, an additional €360 million is lost across the EU due to the indirect effects of counterfeiting of sports equipment – as manufacturers buy fewer goods and services from suppliers, causing knock-on effects in other areas.
Today’s report, released by OHIM through the EU Observatory on Infringements of Intellectual Property Rights,  also shows that up to €150 million is lost annually in government revenue throughout the EU due to this type of counterfeiting. This includes tax, social contributions and VAT which are not paid by producers and distributors of fakes.
The President of OHIM, António Campinos, said:
“Every day, millions of people across the EU play and enjoy sport. However, very few of them know about the economic damage caused by counterfeit sports equipment in their own Member States, and across the EU as a whole. With this series of reports, we are investigating the effects of counterfeits in terms of lost revenue and jobs, sector by sector, to provide a complete picture for policy makers and EU citizens.”
Today’s report is the third in a series of studies undertaken by OHIM into the economic impact of counterfeiting in industrial sectors in the EU, in terms of job and revenue losses. In July, a report into the economic impact of fake clothes, shoes and accessories (including fake sportswear) was released, while in March, OHIM published the first study in this series, into the economic impact of fake cosmetics and personal care items. Each report centres on a sector known to be vulnerable to counterfeiting.
In the UK:  The manufacture of fake sports equipment, like footballs, golf balls and clubs, sports helmets, tennis rackets, gym equipment and skateboards, costs the sector €50 million every year.
In France: France produces 15% of the total EU sports goods production (€800 million) each year. The manufacture of fake sports equipment, like footballs, sports helmets, tennis rackets, skis, gym equipment and skateboards, costs the sector €82million every year.
In Germany: Germany is the second largest producer of sports goods in the EU, accounting for around 20% of total EU production (€1 billion each year). The manufacture of fake sports equipment, like footballs, sports helmets, tennis rackets, skis, gym equipment and skateboards, costs the sector €44 million every year.
In Italy: Italy is the primary producer of sports goods in the EU, accounting for more than 20% of total EU production (€1.2 billion) each year. The manufacture of fake sports equipment, like footballs, sports helmets, tennis rackets, skis, gym equipment and skateboards, costs the sector €53 million every year.
In Spain: The manufacture of fake sports equipment, like footballs, sports helmets, tennis rackets, skis, gym equipment and skateboards, costs the sector €76 million every year.

"Get involved in "Ideas Powered" and have a say on intellectual property"
The first EU-wide interactive website dedicated to young people and intellectual property (IP) is launched today.
The Ideas Powered site is supported by the Office for Harmonization in the Internal Market (OHIM), acting through the European Observatory on Infringements of Intellectual Property Rights.
The site brings together contributions from young designers, composers, entrepreneurs and artists from all across the EU to show how IP underpins and supports innovation and creativity. Ideas Powered website also includes a video competition which invites young people to submit their views on how intellectual property matters to them.
Today's release follows on from a 2013 study carried out by OHIM into how EU citizens – including young people – perceive intellectual property. The results showed that eight out of ten 15-24 year olds in the EU believe that buying counterfeit products has a negative economic effect, and two thirds agree that illegal downloading is a threat to the economy and jobs.
However, 50% still justify buying counterfeits as an act of protest or a smart purchase and 57% think illegally accessing copyright-protected content for personal use is acceptable.
The President of OHIM, António Campinos, said: "This website follows on from our 2013 study, and builds on its results. It aims to provide a fresh outlook on IP – it features contributions from young Europeans who use IP to support their businesses, their livelihoods, their hobbies and their interests. The website is a two way portal; we'll be seeking the views of young people on all aspects of IP in their lives and inviting their contributions too."
The Ideas Powered website is supported by a Facebook and a Twitter account.

Over €26 billion and up to 363,000 jobs
lost every year in the EU due to counterfeiting of clothes, shoes and accessories
The manufacture and distribution of fake clothes, shoes and accessories (like ties, scarves, belts and gloves) takes over €26 billion every year from legitimate EU businesses.
A new study from the Office for Harmonization in the Internal Market (OHIM), the EU’s intellectual property agency, shows that the sale of fake clothes, shoes and accessories in the EU equals nearly 10% of the total sales in the sector throughout the EU-28.
That lost revenue translates into 363,000 lost jobs, as the legitimate manufacturers and retailers make and sell less than they would have done in the absence of counterfeiting, and therefore employs fewer workers.
The study, released through the European Observatory on Infringements of Intellectual Property Rights, entrusted to OHIM, also assesses the indirect effect of the counterfeit trade.
When the knock-on effects on suppliers are taken into account, legitimate businesses across the EU lose €43.3 billion of sales revenue because of counterfeiting, with around 518,000 jobs lost.
Since producers and sellers of fakes do not pay tax, social contributions and VAT, over €8 billion of government revenue across the EU-28 is not collected.
The President of OHIM, António Campinos, said:
“With this report we can put a figure on the economic impact of counterfeiting, and its consequences in terms of lost revenue and jobs at EU level in the clothing, shoes and accessories sector. These results will not only help policy makers in their work, they will also help consumers make more informed choices.”
Today’s report is part of a series of studies into the economic impact of counterfeiting in a number of sectors across the EU, which will be released over the coming months.
In the UK: The trade in fake clothes, shoes and accessories (like ties, scarves, and belts) costs UK manufacturers, retailers and distributors around ₤2.6 billion (€3.6 billion) in lost sales every year and 40,000 jobs.
In France: The trade in fake clothes, shoes and accessories (like ties, scarves, and belts) costs French manufacturers, retailers and distributors around €3.5 billion in lost sales and over 25,000 jobs lost (36,000 if indirect effects are added).
In Germany: The trade in fake clothes, shoes and accessories (like ties, scarves, and belts) costs German manufacturers, retailers and distributors around €3.5 billion in lost sales and over 40,000 jobs lost (over 52,000 if indirect effects are added).
In Italy: The trade in fake clothes, shoes and accessories (like ties, scarves, and belts) costs Italian manufacturers, retailers and distributors around €4.5 billion in lost sales and over 50,000 jobs lost (80,000 if indirect effects are added).
In Spain: The trade in fake clothes, shoes and accessories (like ties, scarves, and belts) means that over 50,000 jobs are lost, which account for nearly 14% of the employment in the sector.

New study finds that companies owning Intellectual Property rights outshine their competitors in economic performancе
Companies owning intellectual property rights (IPRs) have, in general, 29% higher revenue per employee, about six times as many employees and pay wages that are up to 20% higher than firms which do not own IPRs.
These are the main findings of a study carried out by the Office for Harmonization in the Internal Market (OHIM) acting through the EU Observatory on Infringements of Intellectual Property Rights.
The study, which is based on official public financial data from more than 2.3 million European firms, covers companies which own patents, trade marks and designs at both national and EU level.
One of the key findings in the study is that a modest share of small and medium sized enterprises (SMEs) in Europe own patents, trade marks or designs. It also finds that those SMEs which own such rights have almost 32% higher revenue per employee – a significantly higher economic performance, showing significant relative benefits associated with the ownership of IPRs. SMEs are companies which employ fewer than 250 people and which have an annual turnover not exceeding 50 million euro.
António Campinos, President of the Office for Harmonization in the Internal Market (OHIM) said: “SMEs are the backbone of the EU economy, and our study shows that IP rights are an economic asset for them. With the creation of its free, global, online trade mark and design databases (TMview and DesignView), OHIM has already made IPR searches available for millions of firms and individuals. This study, however, shows that we need to do more to promote the economic advantages of IP among SMEs, who benefit from it the most. Our aim is to help SMEs to fully explore the economic potential of their IPR.”
This report, which looks at the contribution of IPRs at a company level, is a follow-up to a first EU-wide analysis of the contribution of IPR intensive industries to economic performance and employment in the European Union.

New report: Intellectual property rights and firm performance in Europe: an economic analysis.


Bulgarian Patent Office prepares to implement e-filing of trade marks and designs applications

Experts from the Office for Harmonization in the Internal Market (Trade Marks and Designs) (OHIM) visited the Bulgarian Patent Office during the period 14-16 May 2013.
The purpose of the visit was to discuss the specific requirements of the national legislation on trade marks and designs in order to implement electronic filing of both industrial property objects.
OHIM in cooperation with the European national offices for trade marks and design works on the creation of e-services projects, which are part of the Cooperation Fund, providing € 50 million for the development and implementation of 23 projects.
Projects relating to e-filing of trade marks and designs are planned to be implemented in the Bulgarian Patent Office by the end of 2013.
A development of projects for electronic renewal, electronic filing of oppositions and requests for revocation and invalidity is foreseen.
Implementation of e-services projects will simplify the access to applying of trade marks and designs and subsequent proceedings for the users of the systems and will improve the quality of administrative services by optimizing and streamlining the procedures.
Users will be able to use the systems for electronic services through the website of the Bulgarian Patent Office without the need for electronic signature.
During the workshop, experts from both offices discussed the process of applying for trade marks and designs and developed specific requirements for the purpose of adapting the software to the Bulgarian legislation.
                                                                                                                                                      
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€500 million lost every year throughout the EU due to fake sports equipment

Praktika Intern 2016 – working with examiners
11 - 28 October 2016
European Patent Office,Munich
The closing date for applications is 31 January 2016.
The Praktika Intern programme is designed for professional representatives with experience in drafting and prosecuting European patent applications. Interns spend three weeks in Directorate-General 1, which is responsible for search, examination and opposition. They have the opportunity to work on actual case files and run prior-art searches. This way, interns will get the chance to look at their daily work from the viewpoint of EPO examiners and gain valuable insights into how the EPO works.
For more information, please see the Official Journal November 2015: OJ EPO 2015, A98
Apply now

€500 million lost every
year throughout the EU due to fake sports equipment

The sale of fake sports equipment, like footballs, sports helmets, tennis rackets, skis, gym equipment and skateboards, costs legitimate EU manufacturers €500 million every year.
A new study from the Office for Harmonization in the Internal Market (OHIM), the EU’s largest intellectual property agency, shows that the sales lost due to counterfeiting of sports equipment – not including sportswear – correspond to 6.5% of all sales in this sector across the EU-28.

The study also shows that approximately 2,800 jobs are lost in this sector throughout the EU, as manufacturers sell less than they would have done in the absence of counterfeiting, and therefore employ fewer people.
Every year, an additional €360 million is lost across the EU due to the indirect effects of counterfeiting of sports equipment – as manufacturers buy fewer goods and services from suppliers, causing knock-on effects in other areas.
Today’s report, released by OHIM through the EU Observatory on Infringements of Intellectual Property Rights,  also shows that up to €150 million is lost annually in government revenue throughout the EU due to this type of counterfeiting. This includes tax, social contributions and VAT which are not paid by producers and distributors of fakes.
The President of OHIM, António Campinos, said:
“Every day, millions of people across the EU play and enjoy sport. However, very few of them know about the economic damage caused by counterfeit sports equipment in their own Member States, and across the EU as a whole. With this series of reports, we are investigating the effects of counterfeits in terms of lost revenue and jobs, sector by sector, to provide a complete picture for policy makers and EU citizens.”
Today’s report is the third in a series of studies undertaken by OHIM into the economic impact of counterfeiting in industrial sectors in the EU, in terms of job and revenue losses. In July, a report into the economic impact of fake clothes, shoes and accessories (including fake sportswear) was released, while in March, OHIM published the first study in this series, into the economic impact of fake cosmetics and personal care items. Each report centres on a sector known to be vulnerable to counterfeiting.
In the UK:  The manufacture of fake sports equipment, like footballs, golf balls and clubs, sports helmets, tennis rackets, gym equipment and skateboards, costs the sector €50 million every year.
In France: France produces 15% of the total EU sports goods production (€800 million) each year. The manufacture of fake sports equipment, like footballs, sports helmets, tennis rackets, skis, gym equipment and skateboards, costs the sector €82million every year.
In Germany: Germany is the second largest producer of sports goods in the EU, accounting for around 20% of total EU production (€1 billion each year). The manufacture of fake sports equipment, like footballs, sports helmets, tennis rackets, skis, gym equipment and skateboards, costs the sector €44 million every year.
In Italy: Italy is the primary producer of sports goods in the EU, accounting for more than 20% of total EU production (€1.2 billion) each year. The manufacture of fake sports equipment, like footballs, sports helmets, tennis rackets, skis, gym equipment and skateboards, costs the sector €53 million every year.
In Spain: The manufacture of fake sports equipment, like footballs, sports helmets, tennis rackets, skis, gym equipment and skateboards, costs the sector €76 million every year.

 

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